Thanks Matt, the client attraction stage is the big thing. With relatively low client numbers I’m able nurture and provide relevant & specific information. I look arrange phone or in person meetings. So attracting clients who can identify with a specific or range of personal (to them) challenges which I’m able to demonstrate I can solve is perhaps the primary focus for me at the prospect acquisition point. I hope that makes sense:)
Trulia did something very similar to Bills.com with their landing page. It starts with a simple form asking for "an address" (which sounds less creepy than "your address," although that's what they mean). Below this simple form field is a bright orange button that contrasts well with the hero image behind the form, and emphasizes that the estimate will be personalized to your home.
Testing can be conducted sequentially or in parallel. In sequential testing, often the easiest to implement, the various versions of the webpages are made available online for a specified time period. In parallel (split) testing, both versions are made available, and the traffic is divided between the two. The results of sequential split testing can be skewed by differing time periods and traffic patterns in which the different tests are run.
That small PDF symbol over the feature image helps set expectations for what format the download will be in. The arrow in front of the subheadline helps further direct your attention to important copy they want visitors to read. Like IMPACT, they also have an auto-checked box to subscribe to their newsletter on their form -- which, if turned into an opt-in check box, is a great way to increase subscribers. All of these small, seemingly insignificant details help bring together a solid, admirable landing page design.
Significant improvements can be seen through testing different copy text, form layouts, landing page images and background colours. However, not all elements produce the same improvements in conversions, and by looking at the results from different tests, it is possible to identify the elements that consistently tend to produce the greatest increase in conversions.[citation needed]
Hi Matt, a really great article which pulls out many strengths. I’m a wedding photographer and I’m researching new ways to funnel visitors by their current; challenges, position in planning their wedding and then addressing short term buyers vs longer cycle buyers who are researching etc. Do you have any advice or examples which could be useful even if a different industry? Thanks Pete
MailChimp is a freemium email marketing tool. Similar to Wufoo, they offer a free plan (good through 2,000 contacts). A bit of background: MailChimp grew their business significantly when they decided to go freemium. How? At the bottom of every email, it would say something like Powered by MailChimp. Every customer email sent helped to spread the word. It created a kind of viral loop.
Netflix changes its background image based on what movies and shows are being promoted. Their site is very simple. There’s a risk reversal right off the bat. You can cancel any time and not be locked into anything. You can try it free for a month. They’re not saying, “Hey, this is movies streaming online.” They’re relying on the power of their brand.
Hi Andrey, it is definitely not for beginners who have no idea how to even make money online at all. If you have a business already, funnel hacks is definitely something that you should invest in. I would say that there are definitely better and more affordable options for beginners too. Paid traffic is a tricky thing, but Funnel Hacks actually break it down easily on how to do it quickly. 
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