When I first wrote this article in 2011, I mentioned how the marketing copy for Crazy Egg’s heat-mapping feature could have been stronger by better explaining how the tool helps customers to increase conversions. While this information is clearer now thanks to the detailed visuals and simple copy layout that allows the reader to skim and scan — it could be better by explaining a bit more. 

Hey Matt! Thanks for this article, it was super helpful! I tried to scroll through some of the comments, but figured I should just shoot you a message. There weren’t a ton of B2C examples in your list and was hoping you had some more up your sleeve. I just launched my company, Make It Hapin, and I’m living on a prayer haha. My finances are limited so my ability to pay for ads in order to test possible funnels is very limited but I’m trying. Make It Hapin is a personalized shopping service designed to help you recreate inspiration images you see on Pinterest and Instagram. The struggle is figuring out a way to get people to remember us while they’re swiping through their feeds. Anyway, I’ve included my website…I’d love it if you could take a look!
It's no surprise Unbounce is near the top of this list -- they've actually written the book on creating high-converting landing pages. Although there are lots of amazing things about this landing page, the two that I absolutely love are: 1) The use of a chat window instead of a classic form, and 2) the detailed -- but well packaged -- information below the form.
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Of course, implementing this isn't easy. You need to first develop your stories, then decide on how you're going to convey those stories and at what drip-rate. For example, your first email or two might go out on the day they first signup, then one email per day might go out afterwards. How much of that will be story-based and how much will be pitches?
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