That small PDF symbol over the feature image helps set expectations for what format the download will be in. The arrow in front of the subheadline helps further direct your attention to important copy they want visitors to read. Like IMPACT, they also have an auto-checked box to subscribe to their newsletter on their form -- which, if turned into an opt-in check box, is a great way to increase subscribers. All of these small, seemingly insignificant details help bring together a solid, admirable landing page design.
That small PDF symbol over the feature image helps set expectations for what format the download will be in. The arrow in front of the subheadline helps further direct your attention to important copy they want visitors to read. Like IMPACT, they also have an auto-checked box to subscribe to their newsletter on their form -- which, if turned into an opt-in check box, is a great way to increase subscribers. All of these small, seemingly insignificant details help bring together a solid, admirable landing page design.
Great article Matt! I have a product-based business (skincare to be precise) and I’ve been doing a lot of research on sales funnels over the past few days but only ever come across examples for service-based businesses and struggle to apply those to my business. I do offer a free skincare guide at opt in but can’t think of anything else for the follow up emails to create trust as well as a limited time offer. Would you have any suggestions?
The final stage of the sales funnel is the action that you're intending them to perform. In most cases this is the purchase. Again, how well you move them through the various stages is going to set you up with a specific conversion for this action. For example, if 100 people click on your offer and 10 people enter your sales funnel but only purchase people purchase, then you have a 2 percent conversion. 
Hi Andrey, it is definitely not for beginners who have no idea how to even make money online at all. If you have a business already, funnel hacks is definitely something that you should invest in. I would say that there are definitely better and more affordable options for beginners too. Paid traffic is a tricky thing, but Funnel Hacks actually break it down easily on how to do it quickly.
Did You Start Out On The $97 Standard Package?  Did it Work For You?  - While results obviously will vary, yes I did start out with a 14 day free ClickFunnels trial and then became a $97 / month customer on the standard package.  At the time, I knew I wouldn't use more than the 20 funnels available and I was better off by focusing on doing less than trying to do it all.  So I went with the Standard Pricing Plan and the cost was manageable for me early in my business.  I made it back quickly and never looked back.  I can't recommend the trial enough because you can "test drive" the system before being billed.  It's a no-brainer if you're thinking of trying Click Funnels.  CLICK HERE to go start your own FREE 14 day ClickFunnels Trial.
Committed: Ideally, you want to close the deal when all red flags have been dealt with. In reality, most deals close while critical red flags still exist. At this point, you have provided the customer with a proposal that outlines key contractual terms. When a customer has agreed to move forward with a deal, they are “committed” (also known as “verbal commitment” or “verbal”). What remains is to work out the details of the contract, delivery and payment, all of which have the potential to“undo” the commitment. The commitment may be offered contingent upon certain terms being met.
Great article Matt! I have a product-based business (skincare to be precise) and I’ve been doing a lot of research on sales funnels over the past few days but only ever come across examples for service-based businesses and struggle to apply those to my business. I do offer a free skincare guide at opt in but can’t think of anything else for the follow up emails to create trust as well as a limited time offer. Would you have any suggestions?
Of course, implementing this isn't easy. You need to first develop your stories, then decide on how you're going to convey those stories and at what drip-rate. For example, your first email or two might go out on the day they first signup, then one email per day might go out afterwards. How much of that will be story-based and how much will be pitches?
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