Hey Matt! Thanks for this article, it was super helpful! I tried to scroll through some of the comments, but figured I should just shoot you a message. There weren’t a ton of B2C examples in your list and was hoping you had some more up your sleeve. I just launched my company, Make It Hapin, and I’m living on a prayer haha. My finances are limited so my ability to pay for ads in order to test possible funnels is very limited but I’m trying. Make It Hapin is a personalized shopping service designed to help you recreate inspiration images you see on Pinterest and Instagram. The struggle is figuring out a way to get people to remember us while they’re swiping through their feeds. Anyway, I’ve included my website…I’d love it if you could take a look!
Of course, regardless of how they enter into your funnel, your goal as a marketer is to move them through the multiple stages that will take them from prospect to buyer. And once they're aware of you, you need to build their interest. To do this, you need to establish a relationship with the customer. You might have enticed them with a great offer (lead magnet) to grab their email address, but actually moving them through the funnel is a far greater challenge. 
Steps in Sales Funnel – This lays out for you, point-by-point, each page and step the customer goes through on their way to making a purchase. In some cases, it also works to point out some of the follow-up steps and “if-then” scenarios. For instance, how does the funnel respond “intelligently” to get prospects who didn’t buy to come back to the website?
Thanks Matt, the client attraction stage is the big thing. With relatively low client numbers I’m able nurture and provide relevant & specific information. I look arrange phone or in person meetings. So attracting clients who can identify with a specific or range of personal (to them) challenges which I’m able to demonstrate I can solve is perhaps the primary focus for me at the prospect acquisition point. I hope that makes sense:)
Thanks for your perspective, you do bring up some good points for sure. I wouldn’t say the 100 day bootcamp is a get rich quick scheme, but you really need to put in the effort as some people gotten results within that time frame so it’s definitely possible. However on the other hand, almost 95% of the people won’t achieve anything because of various reasons too. I’m not too sure what rubbed you wrong, but the ABC is built on promoting Clickfunnels so that’s for sure.
Nauto, a data platform for self-driving cars, helps make autonomous driving safer for companies who manage fleets of self-driving vehicles. Naturally, its customers would need all kinds of information to sell them on this platform. Nauto has it, packaged into a super-simple ebook whose landing page gives you both a brief contact form and some preview statistics to prove why this resource is so important.
Hi Matt, a really great article which pulls out many strengths. I’m a wedding photographer and I’m researching new ways to funnel visitors by their current; challenges, position in planning their wedding and then addressing short term buyers vs longer cycle buyers who are researching etc. Do you have any advice or examples which could be useful even if a different industry? Thanks Pete
In a recent conversation I had with Perry Belcher, co-founder of Native Commerce Media, he told me that you also need to train your prospects to click on links. For example, you could have them click on a link of what interests them or link them to a blog post or eventually to a product or service that you're selling, but you need to train them to build a habit of clicking on those links from the very beginning.
Webflow, a design tool for web developers, packs a lot of information into just a GIF and three form fields. Having the entire sign-up form on a single line is a nice touch here -- not only does it make the page shorter, but filling out each box from left to right shows users how close they are to clicking the fourth blue button and getting started for free.
The final stage of the sales funnel is the action that you're intending them to perform. In most cases this is the purchase. Again, how well you move them through the various stages is going to set you up with a specific conversion for this action. For example, if 100 people click on your offer and 10 people enter your sales funnel but only purchase people purchase, then you have a 2 percent conversion. 
That small PDF symbol over the feature image helps set expectations for what format the download will be in. The arrow in front of the subheadline helps further direct your attention to important copy they want visitors to read. Like IMPACT, they also have an auto-checked box to subscribe to their newsletter on their form -- which, if turned into an opt-in check box, is a great way to increase subscribers. All of these small, seemingly insignificant details help bring together a solid, admirable landing page design.
Of course, regardless of how they enter into your funnel, your goal as a marketer is to move them through the multiple stages that will take them from prospect to buyer. And once they're aware of you, you need to build their interest. To do this, you need to establish a relationship with the customer. You might have enticed them with a great offer (lead magnet) to grab their email address, but actually moving them through the funnel is a far greater challenge. 
Transacted: A sale has transpired when a contract is signed by both parties. From a salesperson’s perspective, the fulfillment of the contract is the responsibility of other parts of the organization, and the salesperson can now focus on the next opportunity. In the case of early-stage start-ups, however, frequently the person that sells is also involved in fulfilling the contract. A signed contract can be booked as revenue from an accounting perspective.
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